Thursday, September 18, 2014

capnromanoff:

consider this: 

thor is always running into little kids who are thrilled to meet him - he doesn’t really understand the concept of signing autographs, but he starts carrying asgardian toys around in his pockets to give to kids he meets (much to shield’s chagrin - how are we supposed to keep alien tech under control when the god of thunder is giving out magnetic propulsion toys to five-year-olds?) 

but one day, he meets this girl who’s nine, maybe ten, and she runs up to him all misty-eyed and immediately asks him if he knows jane foster

and her mother’s embarrassed because “honey, that’s thor, aren’t you excited to see thor?” but the girl just explains that she wants to be a scientist when she grows up, and that jane foster is the astrophysicist (she pronounces the word carefully, as if she’s been practicing) who found out how the rainbow bridge worked - isn’t that so cool? she read about it in kids discover and they watched a documentary in school and dr. foster was in it and it made her think that maybe because she likes planets so much she could be a scientist, too 

and thor smiles broadly and tells her that wanting to be a scientist is a noble dream, and he says “if your mother would be willing, i could introduce you” 

and that’s how jane foster ends up with a tiny science geek in pigtails trailing around behind her in her lab, asking how everything works. jane can’t really comprehend the fact that a kid would want to meet her, but she likes explaining things and she looks at this girl and can’t help seeing herself. thor is just fucking delighted because to him the idea of jane being a child’s hero makes perfect sense, why wouldn’t it? she’s jane

and years later the girl grows up to be an astrophysicist or an astronaut or an aerospace engineer and she never forgets the time that dr. jane foster knelt down beside her and said, don’t let anybody stop you from chasing the stars, if that’s what you want 

jane foster inspiring girls in science, y/y 

charminglyantiquated:

my sister is the only reason I use facebook anymore

Saw my orthodontist today. To quote him, “Now we can rock n’ roll with your teeth.”

If rocking and rolling involves soreness and headaches, then we’re well on our way. 

I also learned some new orthodontia terms today. Wire traps and power chains, specifically. If I were to describe what all was going on with my teeth right now, my mouth would sound like some sort of industrial video game dungeon.

vaginawoolf:

coolator:

i wanna be one of those people who does yoga at sunrise and drinks water out of mason jars filled with berries and twigs and shit

 

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

djlegz:

sizvideos:

Video

Assassin’s Creed screams in the distance

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

lilghoul:

acr666:

1920’s era rework of iggy’s song fancy

she could tap on my face and i would say thank you

peetasallhehasleft:

anachronisticsiren:


Anne Hathaway as Mary Poppins (Saturday Night Live, April 10, 2008) [x]

#MIA ARE YOU MOCKING YOUR GRANDMA?????
A+ tag from camyberry

peetasallhehasleft:

anachronisticsiren:

Anne Hathaway as Mary Poppins (Saturday Night Live, April 10, 2008) [x]

A+ tag from camyberry

(Source: mickeyandcompany)

xxcactusdudexx:

you ever playing a video game and die in such a bullshit way that you need to go lie down for a few hours to recover

avianawareness:

This has to be one of the top cute birdy pics.

avianawareness:

This has to be one of the top cute birdy pics.

benepla:

everyone has their bird friend. like their friend who no matter what is a bird person. they’re among the most valuable.

meowoofau:

13 cats failing at hide and seek

As good as cats think they are at hiding from us, we know better.

(Source: meowoof.com.au)

pardonmewhileipanic:

recoveringfromcfs:

stanley-tsaii:

Just a set of quick photos I did for class.

Chronic illness 101.

Reblogging again because I am about to walk out the door to do something that would drain a half or full battery, and I’m already at 40%

Ugh